Tag Archives: Hybrid Car

Hybrid Car Models Are The Best

Since its first production commercially in the 1990’s, the number of hybrid cars models had swollen into gargantuan volumes.

In 2004, some 80,000 hybrid vehicles (cars and trucks included) were sold, reaching a some 17 million USD in total sales, in the US alone. In 2005, about 200,000 hybrids cars, with different models, were sold. This singular sale represented the total of 1.2 percent of all cars sold in the US, in the same year. Some authorities believe that that by 2007, some 400,000 hybrid vehicles will be sold in the US.

The Toyota Prius, however, rules supreme over other hybrid car models. With 107,897 units sold for the year 2005, which represented 52% of the total hybrid market, Toyota Prius is currently unbeatable. The next most popular hybrid was the Honda Civic Hybrid, which sold over 25,000 vehicles.

Here’s a look at different models of hybrid cars

2005 Honda Civic Hybrid. This is a 4 door/5 seat sedan, with automatic or manual CVT for its transmission. MPG is 47city/ 48 hwy, while the range per fillup is 650 miles. Base on 2005 pricing, this model is worth $19,800 per unit in the US.

This model boasts of such features as full climate control, a Micron air filtration, and built with an Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS). It has Cruise Control, Power windows, mirrors and door locks, together with AM/FM/CD audio system with 4 speakers.

2005 Honda Accord Hybrid. This one is4 door and 5 seat midsize sedan. Transmission is 5-speed automatic, while the mileage (mpg) is 29 city/ 37 hwy. Range per fillup is 600 miles (1000 km). Based on the 2005 Base Retail Price, this car worth $30,000 in the US.

This hybrid car model’s notable features are its unique hybrid air-conditioning system, Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS), Grade logic control, a Driver’s seat with 8-way power adjustment, and a Satellite-linked navigation system. The last feature, though, is optional for the owner.

Another hybrid car model from Honda that made it to the list is its 2005 Insight. It has 3 doors and two seat coupe. Transmission is CVT automatic or 5-speed manual. Mileage (mpg) is 60 city/ 70 hwy (3.2L/100km), while its range per fillup is 600 miles (1000 km).

Retail price is pegged at 2003 Price: $19,080 – $21,280 in the US.

In terms of features, this hybrid car model has full climate control, a CFC-Free Air Conditioning, with Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS), and an Electronic instrument display. It also has a tachometer, power windows and mirrors; door locks; and AM/FM Stereo/Cassette System.

2005 Toyota Prius. Of course, the first among the hybrid car models to successfully reached the US market is included among the best. This one is 4 door and a 5 seat sedan with a liftback. Transmission is CVT automatic, while mileage (mpg) is 60 city/ 51 hwy. range per fillup is 566 miles. Based on the 2005 Base Retail Price, this model is $20,875 per unit, in the US.

This one has a full climate control, a CFC-Free Air Conditioning and an Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS). Also comes with central instrument display, LCD energy monitor, power windows and mirrors, door locks with deluxe AM/FM ETR/Cassette with 4 speakers.

2005 Ford Escape Hybrid. The Ford answer with Japanese cars is this 4 door/5 seat SUV unit. Transmission is CVT automatic with a mileage (city/hwy) of 2wd 31/36 | 4wd 29/33. Range per fillup is 400 to 600 miles. It has manual Air Conditioning, with Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS), a roof rack with 2 horizontal bars and also comes with power windows and mirrors, door locks, and AM/FM stereo with 6-disc in-dash CD system. The price based on 2005 $26,970

2006 Lexus RX 400h. This hybrid car model is a 4 door/5 seat SUV unit. Transmission is ECVT automatic, a 31city/ 27hwy mileage (mpg), and the range per fillup is 450 to 530 miles. The retail price is $48,500

This one has dual-zone automatic climate control, and an exclusive Lexus 8-speaker sound system, 6-disk CD, power tilt and slide moon roof, transceiver to operate garage doors, lights, and part-time all-wheel drive (AWD).

The 2005 hybrid car models include some of the best and ingenious ones. Car experts believe that other models in the future will just take their improvement from this most productive year in the history of hybrid cars.

A Quick Look On 2006 Hybrid Cars

Demand for hybrid cars has sharply grown over the past three years, as pump prices continue to surge and eating a considerable part of the household budget.

Hybrid cars may not be the complete solution to rising oil prices but they are very economical, as they rely more on electricity instead of gas for power. For 2006, business conditions have remained turbulent. The current crisis in Israel and Lebanon will likely have an adverse effect on oil markets given that they are very near the world’s top oil producers.

Other issues that will keep gas prices high include China’s demand, terrorist attacks on refineries and volatility in stock markets. Is 2006 finally the right time to jump on the bandwagon for hybrid cars? For 2006, the top Japanese car makers Honda and Toyota have released an impressive line of hybrid cars that have been updated to conform with the demands of the daily driver.

The hybrid cars for 2006 promises more power behind the steering wheel but gas consumption will be comparable to a child guzzling a bad-tasting cough syrup.

Honda 2006 Accord Hybrid

The new Accord Hybrid from Honda is 4-door sedan ideal for families with 2-3 kids. This car comes in two trims and 5-speed automatic transmission. Overdrive option is standard equipment. For those that enjoy long and leisurely rides, Honda is offering a Accord Hybrid equipped with a Navigation system.

Both trims are powered by a standard V6, 3.0-liter, 253-horsepower engine. The Accord Hybrid is capable of 25-mpg in city driving and 34-mpg in highway driving.

The Honda Accord Hybrid is well suited for the highways and boasts of excellent responsiveness and outstanding acceleration.

Initial impressions

The 2006 Honda Accord Hybrid has been criticized for its disappointing fuel economy but lauded for its outstanding performance especially in fast-driving. The car battery used in the car is relatively low in power and supposed does not effectively maximize the hybrid technology unlike rival models.

Some users have also been critical over the “rough” automatic transmission shifting between gears and poor flawed synchronization between engine and battery.

Honda 2006 Civic Hybrid

 

The new Honda Civic Hybrid is a 4-door sedan ideal for small families. The vehicle comes in two trims namely the the CVT AT-PZEV w/ Navigation System and the CVT AT-PZEV

 

A standard I4 1.3-liter 110-horsepower hybrid engine powers the 2006 Civic Hybrid car. This model has the capability to run 49-mpg in city driving and 51-mpg in highway drives.

 

Initial impressions

 

The 2006 Civic Hybrid car is a top-notch performer especially for who are looking for the perfect driving experience. The interior has been lauded for its attractive lay-out and design. Gas consumption is exceptional, as delivers near or slightly above its specifications.

 

However, the 2006 Civic Hybrid has been criticized more on its ambitious despite. The digital speedometer is a nice new touch but can be distracting especially during night drives. The Civic Hybrid only comes with rear drum brakes, which is disappointing considering that the Civic has been named car of the year.

 

The hand brake is also placed on odd location and will be discomforting for those with large thighs. The 2006 Civic Hybrid is a ‘driver’s car” and will perform best when used in the highways.

 

2006 Toyota Prius

 

Updated for 2006, the new Toyota Prius is a 4-door sedan, ideal for small families. This hybrid car only comes in one trim has a 4-Door Liftback.

 

The 2006 Toyota Prius is powered with by a standard I4, 1.5-liter, hybrid engine running 110-horsepower. In city driving, the Prius can achieve 60-mpg and 51-mpg in highway driving.

 

Initial impressions

 

The Prius features a spacious interior that can easily fit small families. Ideal for pedestrian drivers but those conscious with performance should stay away, as acceleration is slow. In addition, consumers have also been disappointed over the inability of the car to reach its advertised consumption and high price. For those tht want to save the world the Prius is great but look the other way if you want to save money.

All About Hybrid car Battery Packs

Those considering purchasing a hybrid car may be a little concerned about what’s under the hood. Hybrid cars have battery-powered motors. Since a battery-powered motor is not something that typically comes to mind when people think about what’s under the hood of a car, it’s a good idea to get a good understanding of the hybrid-car battery-pack. Below are a few facts about it.

Battery packs in hybrid cars do not need to be replaced

Made to last over the lifetime of the vehicle, a hybrid car’s warranty covers the battery for a time period that lasts between eight and ten years. In terms of mileage, a battery pack is expected to last between 150, 000 and 200,000 miles, and it probably lasts longer than that.

Battery toxicity is a concern, but not a major concern

Hybrid cars use NiMH batteries, not the rechargeable nickel cadmium. Nickel cadmium batteries are usually detrimental to the environment, but the NiMH batteries that are used in hybrid cars are fully recyclable.

 

Hybrid batteries contain hundreds of cells

 

Hundreds of cells means that hybrid cars have a lot of complexity going on underneath their hoods, and complexity does usually mean expensive, but with the generous warranty car manufacturers are giving on these cars, there is little involved in purchasing a hybrid.

 

The numbers of battery failures in hybrids have been really low

 

When I say low, I mean really low. If failure happens, it’s probably before the cars even get off the lot. Toyota has even said that some of its original Prius models have packs that have gone over 300,000 miles.

 

The cost of replacing hybrid batteries isn’t even an issue

 

It isn’t an issue because the battery packs in hybrid cars are built to last. The Department of Energy looked into hybrid vehicles, but stopped its test when the capacity was “just like new” after 160,000 miles. So no one really seems to know for sure what it costs to replace the battery pack in a hybrid car.

 

The battery packs in hybrid cars are evolving

 

If we look further into the future, the next generation of hybrid batteries is in the works. The goal: To discover a technology that gives lots of power, lasts for the hybrid car’s lifetime, and costs less to make.

 

If the battery pack in your hybrid car does run out, there is a solution

 

Toyota has put out some advice on what to do if your hybrid battery should run out after the warranty has ended. The advice is to recondition the battery. The solution works well because if something goes wrong, the problem lies within only one of the 28 modules that the battery is made up of. So if you simply replace the problematic module with one that matches the chemistry of the other 27 modules, your hybrid car’s battery should be in good shape. You can find a match by getting a battery pack from another car that has a similar mileage and age.

Affording Gas Buying A Hybrid And Other Options

As you pull up to the pump and fuel your car up with $10-$50 worth of gas, you may find yourself releasing a long drawn out sigh. How did gas get so expensive? Should you check out one of those hybrid cars, you saw on the news? Everyone is talking about hybrid cars anyway. Hybrid cars and other types of cars may seem like a good idea, but before you go out and do something rash, maybe you should ask yourself some questions about how you can begin to save on gas.

There are many options out there that include everything from staying home to purchasing a hybrid car, but you have to find out what’s best for you. You can only do that by asking yourself the following questions.

Should you just drive less?

Sure, you could spend the rest of your life at home on the couch, but how will you eat then? I know, you’re thinking you will walk more and get more exercise. That may be true, but what happens when you get bored with walking and riding your bike? How are you going to be able to get to the gym? And, did you forget about work? You know you love listening to your books on tape while you sit in traffic at the end of the workday. Should you drive less? Probably not. What should you do? Well, have you ever considered buying a hybrid car?

Should I buy a car that gets more miles for less gas?

You could do this, but what about when the vehicle starts to depreciate and it’s not as fuel-efficient as you thought it would be? And subconsciously, because you know you have a car that gets more mileage, you are going to start traveling more miles than you traveled before.

Should I get up each morning looking for the cheaper gas prices in the area?

Who has time for that? If you think about it, you could probably spend your time better finding the right answer to this question: Do you really want to spend extra time looking for a cheap gas station? What will your boss think if you arrive late for work and tell him you were trying to be cheap? And really, how long do you think you’ll last doing that?

Should I find a way to run my car on batteries?

Well you certainly don’t want to have to recharge your car each morning before you go to work because that might make you late. With a hybrid car, you won’t have to worry about that. Therefore, the next question should be obvious.

Should I purchase a hybrid car?

Maybe you should. It’s possible that buying a hybrid car could be a sensible way to avoid high gas prices. Does your car depreciate after you drive it off the lot? A hybrid won’t do that. It becomes brings the buyer in more and more money as they save on gas. A hybrid car just might be a good choice here. However, it’s still a good idea to conduct further research on hybrid cars.